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Display Name Post: Easy Strength Appropriate for High School Lifters?        (Topic#36981)
fcc74
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Total Posts: 16
11-14-19 10:52 AM - Post#890331    



Hello all,

I have seen in a few places that Easy Strength is more appropriate for an experienced lifter. Can anyone share the reasoning for this. Along those lines, are there certain programs that would be more appropriate for a high school group of athletes?
 
vegpedlr
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Total Posts: 830
11-14-19 11:14 AM - Post#890332    



My .02 is that the favorable hormonal environment means HS kids can handle more. This assumes they’ve got good enough technique not to get sloppy. But it also depends on what else they’re doing. If busy with other sports practice, then ES is good in season work.
 
Mr. Kent
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Total Posts: 179
11-14-19 02:49 PM - Post#890346    



I can't speak to the reasoning of the authors as to why ES is most appropriate for an experience lifter, but having been through the program I can offer a few opinions:

1. ES is something that relies on frequency; most novice lifters (generally speaking) don't have either the discipline or ability to lift nearly every day. In the case of HS athletes, you do theoretically have them 5 days per week, but that brings me to point #2: ES also relies on excellent technique, self-evaluation skills, and patience. The vast majority of 14-18 year olds that I know lack all three of these.
my training log: What Mr. Kent is Doing Now


 
Old Miler
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Total Posts: 1108
11-14-19 03:21 PM - Post#890348    



  • Mr. Kent Said:


1.point #2: ES also relies on excellent technique, self-evaluation skills, and patience. The vast majority of 14-18 year olds that I know lack all three of these.



My youngest, when in that age range, lacked #2 and #3, but he picked up techniques WAAYYY better than this fifty-something dad ;-) Sporty teenagers pick stuff up fast. Just not "patience", because after all, they are teenagers.

 
Dan John
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Total Posts: 11241
11-14-19 05:27 PM - Post#890355    



It's their complete "non-knowledge" of heavy, medium and light. They simply can enjoy the linear progression and enjoy the ride.

Daniel John
Just handing down what I was handed down...


Make a Difference.
Live. Love. Laugh.
Balance work, rest, play and pray (enjoy beauty and solitude)
Sleep soundly. Drink Water. Eat veggies and protein. Walk.
Wear your seat belt. Don’t smoke. Floss your teeth.
Put weights overhead. Pick weights off the floor. Carry weights.
Reread great books. Say thank you


 
Mr. Kent
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Total Posts: 179
11-15-19 09:59 AM - Post#890390    



  • Old Miler Said:


My youngest, when in that age range, lacked #2 and #3, but he picked up techniques WAAYYY better than this fifty-something dad ;-) Sporty teenagers pick stuff up fast. Just not "patience", because after all, they are teenagers.




That's fair. I probably shouldn't have generalized all teenagers in that way. By 'self-evaluation' I was getting at what Dan ultimately said best up above. Understanding how to stay within yourself and having the patience to do so seem to be the cornerstones of ES. And probably most of life too.
 
DanMartin
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Total Posts: 20079
11-15-19 11:00 AM - Post#890392    



If had it all to do over, I would have kids new to training spend a protracted period of time building a base of fitness with all sorts of bodyweight exercises.

Then on to kettlebell exercises, with an emphasis on swings and weighted carries.

After that, I would move on to "traditional" barbell and dumbbell work. And even then, I would avoid any high skill ballistic lifts such as the power clean and power snatch.

At the end of the day, particularly at the scholastic level, consistency, where the athlete keeps showing up 2-4 days a week to train will win the race.
Practice what you suck at.


 
vegpedlr
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Total Posts: 830
11-15-19 09:00 PM - Post#890406    



',,
  • DanMartin Said:
If had it all to do over, I would have kids new to training spend a protracted period of time building a base of fitness with all sorts of bodyweight exercises.

Then on to kettlebell exercises, with an emphasis on swings and weighted carries.

After that, I would move on to "traditional" barbell and dumbbell work. And even then, I would avoid any high skill ballistic lifts such as the power clean and power snatch.

At the end of the day, particularly at the scholastic level, consistency, where the athlete keeps showing up 2-4 days a week to train will win the race.


So, the DMPM then?
 
Jordan D
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Total Posts: 148
11-16-19 12:27 AM - Post#890409    



  • DanMartin Said:
If had it all to do over, I would have kids new to training spend a protracted period of time building a base of fitness with all sorts of bodyweight exercises.

Then on to kettlebell exercises, with an emphasis on swings and weighted carries.

After that, I would move on to "traditional" barbell and dumbbell work. And even then, I would avoid any high skill ballistic lifts such as the power clean and power snatch.

At the end of the day, particularly at the scholastic level, consistency, where the athlete keeps showing up 2-4 days a week to train will win the race.



This is great.

6 months to 1 year of pushups, pullups and dips might also solve a common problem I see with skinnier 14-15 year olds when they start a barbell linear progression. The squat flies up into the mid-200s or higher, but their upper body musculature becomes the limiting factor. Hard to carry 315 on bony shoulders, and it gets discouraging. Then they want to try a new T-nation program every week. Get them to 15 pullups and dips first, and you may obviate that problem. Build a more solid base, so to speak.

Though I suspect that only naturally skinny people know what I'm talking about here.
 
DanMartin
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Total Posts: 20079
11-16-19 12:35 PM - Post#890421    



  • Jordan D Said:
  • DanMartin Said:
If had it all to do over, I would have kids new to training spend a protracted period of time building a base of fitness with all sorts of bodyweight exercises.

Then on to kettlebell exercises, with an emphasis on swings and weighted carries.

After that, I would move on to "traditional" barbell and dumbbell work. And even then, I would avoid any high skill ballistic lifts such as the power clean and power snatch.

At the end of the day, particularly at the scholastic level, consistency, where the athlete keeps showing up 2-4 days a week to train will win the race.



This is great.

6 months to 1 year of pushups, pullups and dips might also solve a common problem I see with skinnier 14-15 year olds when they start a barbell linear progression. The squat flies up into the mid-200s or higher, but their upper body musculature becomes the limiting factor. Hard to carry 315 on bony shoulders, and it gets discouraging. Then they want to try a new T-nation program every week. Get them to 15 pullups and dips first, and you may obviate that problem. Build a more solid base, so to speak.

Though I suspect that only naturally skinny people know what I'm talking about here.



I would do all sorts of things besides the big three. (Push-ups, Pull-ups and Dips) Deep knee bends, hip bridges, Wrestler's bridge*, planks, hyper-extensions*, Bird Dogs and squat thrusts. Add in any sort of manual pushing and pulling exercises with a partner.

Running, jumping and sprints also fit in with this too.

I cannot agree more fully about building up the shoulder girdle of the skinny teenage boy.

*Do not and I repeat, do not over do these two exercises.
Practice what you suck at.


 
Andy Mitchell
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Total Posts: 5069
11-17-19 05:24 PM - Post#890449    



I’d place an importance on: neck and hand strength but I’m coming from a sport aspect I suppose I always have.
Protecting the brain and development of hand strength is a real advantage when playing football and often neglected.

The other thing on top of mastering the basic exercises are using close body exercises like the one’s you can only use with kettle bells and such.
You can never be too thin, too tan or too rich..
D-mart


 
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