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Jordan D
At home here
Posts 318
Jordan D
10-27-18 02:28 AM - Post#872704    

Hi Gentlemen,

I've been a lurker on here for years, and have learned much from many of you. Thank you.

I'm looking for examples of people who have seen appreciable increases in back squat strength during the EES/40-day program. In the past, I myself have seen great deadlift progress, and near-miraculous pull-up gains, even while dropping 10lbs on the program. At the same time, however, and surely thanks to the weight loss, my back squat dropped by 5%.

I know Dan John has said many times that squats don't work out well on this program. Personally I wonder if this is due to a greater potential for form creep in the squat - if it's just less structurally stable, or less "locked in" than the deadlift. Either way, I'm hoping to find counterexamples. I wouldn't bother if I hadn't read this great thread where the OP made respectable gains on his back squat.

I should note that I'm really only looking for people who'd already attained what you might call "intermediate" strength levels, i.e. a 300lb+ 1RM and beyond. Going from 185 to 225 is awesome, and laudable, but it's not as instructive for my purposes at the moment.

Disclaimer: I'll be starting the 40-day program again in a week, and am trying to decide how, and whether, to include back squats or experiment with power cleans. I love this program, and plan on training this way for many years.

So...any monstrous Easy Strength squatters out there?
Kyle Aaron
husband, father, PT - in that order
Posts 1706
Kyle Aaron
10-27-18 03:20 AM - Post#872705    

It's how I took my squat "sorta max" from 165 to 180kg. But my bodyweight went up, not down.

Or at least, using my version of it (3-5 lifts, using 60-80% of current "sorta max" for about 10 reps total, done 3-5 days a week for six weeks).

When we use this version of ES, a careful persual of the logs show the lifts that went nowhere or declined are those where the person was always at 60% or always at 80%; the best results come when the person uses the whole range.

If your bodyweight drops and your pullups go up, that is unsurprising. It's like saying your bench press reps went up when you dropped the bench from 225 to 215.

Deadlift is the one we often see the biggest gains on in programmes like this, simply because it's usually the first time the person has done a lot of deadlifting. Practice.

Generally speaking, unless you're obese or a noob, if you drop bodyweight then your lifts will drop or stall, too. Such is life.
Athletic Club East
Strength in numbers

iPood
Grand Pooh-Bah
Posts 1980
iPood
10-27-18 03:26 AM - Post#872706    

I’ve experienced moderate success with all my lifts (not all of them at the same time, though) during my Easy Strength stints.

Thing is, I never neither wanted nor expected my lifts to skyrocket. I was trying to do the bare minimum to not-lose strength and I ended up making a bit of progress (which was a very welcome surprise).

I suppose my particular variation of the program could be re-branded as Lazy Strength or even Laid Back Strength.
"I think we often spend too much time focusing on max fitness
and not nearly enough on maintaining our minimums.
It seems we need to think sustainable rather than obtainable.
Meaning whatever we do today, we can do it again tomorrow.
Never taking so much from ourselves that we can't."

Dan Martin

Jordan D
At home here
Posts 318
Jordan D
10-27-18 06:03 AM - Post#872707    

  • Kyle Aaron Said:
It's how I took my squat "sorta max" from 165 to 180kg. But my bodyweight went up, not down.

Or at least, using my version of it (3-5 lifts, using 60-80% of current "sorta max" for about 10 reps total, done 3-5 days a week for six weeks).

When we use this version of ES, a careful persual of the logs show the lifts that went nowhere or declined are those where the person was always at 60% or always at 80%; the best results come when the person uses the whole range.



That's fascinating. Exactly what I'm looking for. Thank you. By 3-5 lifts do you mean a hinge, a squat, and a press? Or 3-5 variations on the squat over time (i.e. 2 weeks of back squat, 2 of front, 2 of zerchers, etc)?

And just to clarify, were you doing 6 x 1 and 5-3-2 days and still staying within that 60%-80% range?

  • Kyle Aaron Said:
If your bodyweight drops and your pullups go up, that is unsurprising. It's like saying your bench press reps went up when you dropped the bench from 225 to 215.


Forgive me I should have said weighted pullups. I went from easy 2 x 5 with no added weight, to easy 2 x 5 with 20kg added. So even though I lost about 4-5kg of bodyweight over the 8 weeks, I was still wildly impressed by the results. That's how Easy Strength "clicked" for me. I've achieved high pullup reps in the past, and reasonably heavy weighted pullups, but never so easily.
AAnnunz
Uncle Al
Posts 23194
AAnnunz
10-27-18 08:14 AM - Post#872709    

I've done EES several times and always do well with squats, because I start with no more than 50% 1rm on 2x5 days and work on my patterning, taking on every segment of the movement. After the last time I did the program, I got to legal depth with all three of my attempts at a meet, which for me is a miracle.

Weighted chin/pullup and deadlift improvements are a given. Bench press not so much. (Probably an age thing.)
Be strong. Be in shape. Be a man among men, regardless of your age or circumstances.

Dan John
Carpal tunnel from posting!
Posts 11700
Dan John
10-27-18 12:09 PM - Post#872711    

That might be it right there...easy squats.
Daniel John
Just handing down what I was handed down...


Make a Difference.
Live. Love. Laugh.
Balance work, rest, play and pray (enjoy beauty and solitude)
Sleep soundly. Drink Water. Eat veggies and protein. Walk.
Wear your seat belt. Don’t smoke. Floss your teeth.
Put weights overhead. Pick weights off the floor. Carry weights.
Reread great books. Say thank you

Kyle Aaron
husband, father, PT - in that order
Posts 1706
Kyle Aaron
10-27-18 05:14 PM - Post#872717    

  • Jordan D Said:

That's fascinating. Exactly what I'm looking for. Thank you. By 3-5 lifts do you mean a hinge, a squat, and a press?


3-5 of the classic DJ 5. Some sort of squat, some sort of push, some sort of pull, some sort of hip hinge, some sort of loaded carry.

  • Quoting:
And just to clarify, were you doing 6 x 1 and 5-3-2 days and still staying within that 60%-80% range?


No, that's too complicated for me, and judging by the questions that pop up, for most people.

To be clear, this is my version of ES:

  • every workout day at least, have 1 cup of oats for breakfast, two pieces of fruit for morning tea, and for lunch two palm-sized pieces of meat or fish and two cups of mixed vegies (or 4 cups salad)
  • pick 3-5 lifts
  • find your "sorta max" in each, and calculate 60% and 80% of them
  • 60% is your floor, you never do less than that, however awful you feel; 80% is your ceiling, you never do more, however great you feel
  • 3-5 days a week you do a total of 10 reps with 60-80% of each lift. Get them out however you feel like on the day, whether it be 10 singles, a set of 10, 3x3, 5,3,2, doesn't matter. Though if you need to do singles with 60%, or can do 10 in one go with 80%, you messed up your "sorta max" test somehow.
  • do this for 6 weeks


If you continue with ES then you do this,
  • retest your "sorta max" in those 3-5 lifts
  • you'll find 1-2 went up a lot, 1-2 a bit, and 1-2 stayed the same. Careful examination of the logs usually shows the one that didn't improve, the person spent all their time at 60%, or all their time at 80%.
  • whichever improved the most, and whichever the least, swap out for "same but different", eg back squats swap for front squats, cleans for snatches, etc.

    As an example, for my squat it went,

    Sorta max = 165kg
    60-80% = 100-132.5kg (I rounded to nearest 2.5kg)

    In six weeks I did 24 workouts. I did 4 at 60% which was either a set of 10, or 5,5; I did 4 at 80% which was 3x3 except one time was 5 doubles, which took me ages. The other 16 were something in between. On 22 of those workout days I followed the dietary advice, and in fact now that I look at it, the 5 grindy doubles with 80% was a day I didn't follow the advice, for breakfast I had eggs on toast, I ate no fruit, and for lunch I just had a sandwich, so there you go.

    My experience and that of people who've tried this is that,

    • most people can't handle more complicated dietary advice than that given above, but if they follow that, they're better than they are now. Only 47% of Aussies have the recommended 2 pieces of fruit a day, and 7% have the 5 vegies, or 2.5 cups, and only about 25% get the recommended fibre; the listed advice will get them at least 80% of the way there. More nutrients means more energy for life and workouts, and better digestion means better sleep.
    • 3 lifts works best for pure strength gains
    • If you do 4 or 5 then those extra 1-2 never improve anyway, you might still do them because you enjoy them or don't want them to decline, especially ones with a high technique component like the quick lifts.
    • 2-3 days a week maintains strength (one lift might edge up but it's within the random variation you get with any max testing), 4 improves it, 5 feels good but doesn't seem to add anything more to the lifts compared to 4.


    Squats are tricky, because they seem to need more practice than the other slow lifts, but they take a lot out of you. An 80% squat is a different experience to an 80% press.
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

  • Old Miler
    Master trainer
    Posts 1382
    Old Miler
    10-27-18 05:35 PM - Post#872718    

    • Kyle Aaron Said:
  • 3 lifts works best for pure strength gains
  • If you do 4 or 5 then those extra 1-2 never improve anyway, you might still do them because you enjoy them or don't want them to decline, especially ones with a high technique component like the quick lifts.




  • Just one data point here, but I agree with the above. Deadlift, press and pull-ups seems to cover the lot, and if I tried anything else it usually ended up mutating into an easy warmup drill or a cooldown activity rather than an actual strength exercise after the first few sessions.

    In particular deadlifts and any kind of squat really feels like "too much" - it's 20 hard reps for the legs and core, not 10.
    vegpedlr
    Old hand here on IOL
    Posts 1068
    vegpedlr
    10-27-18 09:08 PM - Post#872721    

    Kyle, that was a fantastic post. My experience parallels much of that. And it still gives me things to think about.
    Dan John
    Carpal tunnel from posting!
    Posts 11700
    Dan John
    10-28-18 05:18 AM - Post#872729    

    Mods,
    Can we stick this at the top?
    Daniel John
    Just handing down what I was handed down...


    Make a Difference.
    Live. Love. Laugh.
    Balance work, rest, play and pray (enjoy beauty and solitude)
    Sleep soundly. Drink Water. Eat veggies and protein. Walk.
    Wear your seat belt. Don’t smoke. Floss your teeth.
    Put weights overhead. Pick weights off the floor. Carry weights.
    Reread great books. Say thank you

    AAnnunz
    Uncle Al
    Posts 23194
    AAnnunz
    10-28-18 10:25 AM - Post#872735    

    Hey, Kyle, thanks for taking the time to breakdown your version of the program. Very well thought out.

    You only listed meals through lunch. May we assume this is to fuel training later in the day? If so, do you also have post workout recommendations (snack, dinner)?

    I know you've had success coaching masters class powerlifters. Have you tried this method as meet prep? Beginners and early intermediates would do well, of course, but I've always felt more advanced lifters need to practice straining with heavier weight (at least a few sessions of 90%+ two to four weeks out from competition). Based on your impressive squat numbers, however, I may have to rethink that philosophy. Any thoughts?
    Be strong. Be in shape. Be a man among men, regardless of your age or circumstances.

    Kiwi5
    At home here
    Posts 248
    Kiwi5
    10-28-18 03:20 PM - Post#872746    

    Kyle- what were your average rest periods between sets?
    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    10-28-18 08:03 PM - Post#872769    

    • AAnnunz Said:
    You only listed meals through lunch. May we assume this is to fuel training later in the day? If so, do you also have post workout recommendations (snack, dinner)?


    I'm in no way a nutritionist. But this is not really about ideal nutrition, it's about trying to build good habits. If they get breakfast right, they'll probably get lunch and dinner right. If they get lunch right, they'll almost certainly get dinner right.

    By "right" I mean following the Australian government's , or at least 80% of the way there. Like I said, only 47% of Aussies eat 2+ pieces of fruit a day, and only 7% get 5+ serves (2.5 cups chopped) of vegies. Most people get plenty of protein, it's just coming packaged with a lot of other stuff, like a chicken nugget or something.

    It's like DJ said about the 5+1 movements: you get someone who isn't squatting and doing loaded carries, you get them to do them, and in three weeks they're better. "Find out what they're not doing, get them to do it, they're better!"

    I think it's the same for food. "Find out what they're not eating, get them to eat it, they're better!" And most people aren't getting enough fruit and vegies and fibre.

    DJ used to say a lot, quoting his old coach, "The beginning and end of all nutrition questions is: what did you have for breakfast?" And I've found this to be very true.

    The best answer I ever got was, "couple of VBs." That's a heavy beer here in Australia. Did I really need to ask him what he had for lunch? Did it matter?

    I trained a guy, 30 years old, he was taking Metamucil. I asked, "What did you have for breakfast?" He answered, "Last three days, white bread roll with chicken loaf and mayo in the car on the way to work."
    "Okay, how about you try... some oats. Get up 15 minutes earlier, cook oats and eat them."
    "Hey," said his wife, "we're shift workers, our sleep is precious to us."
    "I'm a father of young kids, I get that. But here's the thing: you're taking Metamucil. Have you ever had trouble sleeping because of constipation? Even woken in the night with a bad belly? Maybe if things were flowing better, you'd have 15 minutes more sleep at the start, and the other sleep would be better."
    "Fair enough."
    "Come over here and write on the whiteboard, "I will set the alarm 15 minutes earlier and get up and make and eat oats for breakfast. And sign it. And then everyone in the gym can see."

    One week later he didn't need Metamucil anymore. He's a doctor, by the way. So this is not about knowledge - he knew what to do! - this is about habits. So I think that saying of DJ's is very astute: if they get breakfast right, then probably the rest of the day won't be awful.

    This also follows the work of Coach Stevo of Habitry.com: find 1-2 small sustainable habits that will have an impact. It doesn't have to be a huge impact, just enough to make the person think, "I changed something, and I'm better... maybe I could change other things?"

    There's a vid with DJ coaching the snatch, and he says, "This thing where they swing the bar out... I used to try to fix that, then I realised they'll do that with the empty bar, they won't do that with 60kg." Just by snatching a lot, without anyone poking at them, they figure things out. That had a big impact on me, that insight - it's one of those things that's obvious once someone else says it. Fix one or two things, and over time watch the other stuff just fall into place without your having to do anything else. I call it Lazy Coaching, but we could call it coaching minimalism.

    Or maybe Easy Coaching. Fix one or two things, then sit back and let the other things fall into place over time.

    If they get breakfast right, they'll probably get lunch and dinner right. If they get lunch right, they'll almost certainly get dinner right. Without my saying anything more.

    • Quoting:
    I know you've had success coaching masters class powerlifters. Have you tried this method as meet prep? Beginners and early intermediates would do well, of course, but I've always felt more advanced lifters need to practice straining with heavier weight (at least a few sessions of 90%+ two to four weeks out from competition). Based on your impressive squat numbers, however, I may have to rethink that philosophy. Any thoughts?


    I think you're right, competitive lifters need some time grinding away. The disadvantage of any "minimum effective dose" approach is that if you do a meet, that might be the first time in your life you've ever felt that weight on your back or in your hands. I have actually had lifters miss their openers that way - they were physically quite capable of lifting it, but they freaked out. They went on to make that lift as a second, but it was a wasted attempt.

    Now, these are all beginner lifters, in their first couple of years of lifting. What follows is just speculation, I want to be clear. I think it would be different for someone with decades of lifting. A newbie will panic, someone who's been doing it for years won't.

    Say you get a guy with 12 months' lifting experience, and another with 10 years, both can squat 200kg. Both take three months off. The first guy has to basically start again from nothing, the second guy can start back just 20% down from where he was. It's that lifting experience. So I would say that the second guy can actually get more from an Easy Strength approach.

    On the other hand, older lifters seem to detrain very quickly, and need to stay at a high percentage of their max to keep it up there. But those older lifters I've trained all started when they were older, I haven't trained 70 years who've been lifting since they were 20. And as I said above, I think that's a different thing.

    But on the whole, no, I wouldn't recommend Easy Strength for a powerlifting meet.

    • Kiwi5 Said:
    Kyle- what were your average rest periods between sets?


    Fairly lengthy. My gym's also my workplace with a bookshelf, and my workout time is my time to myself without kids or clients around, so I sit and read training books between sets. I didn't need to sit around for ten minutes between sets. I wasn't trying to make it quick.

    I don't time anyone on workouts in my gym, except that at 6 o'clock I'm going in for dinner, and at 9 o'clock the gym closes unless you're really interesting to talk to.

    Rest until you're ready to go again. Most people in my gym rest much longer than they need to, the gym is their coffee shop, there's lots of chatting. That's okay, it's a community. They develop body and soul together. They take 1.5-2hr to do a workout they could do in 1hr.

    • Old Miler Said:
    deadlifts and any kind of squat really feels like "too much" - it's 20 hard reps for the legs and core, not 10.


    I think this is right. Either squat, or deadlift. Though obviously as Miler says, you might do some of other movements as a warmup, I think you do have to choose which to focus on for those 6 weeks. I didn't even try to deadlift after squatting 180. Of course, that wasn't a "sorta max", so in fact I might really have gained 5-10kg on the squat, not 15. It wasn't this year so that's just my memory of it looking back.
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    Dan John
    Carpal tunnel from posting!
    Posts 11700
    Dan John
    10-29-18 04:09 AM - Post#872779    

    Stevo made a great point to me: when you are trying to form a new habit...go smaller.

    Make it so easy it is laughable. I know tinyhabits says the same thing, but it really helped me.

    Kyle...this has been just great, thank you. I would suggest you round this up into an article. All the heavy lifting has been done for an article (pun alert)...great stuff.
    Daniel John
    Just handing down what I was handed down...


    Make a Difference.
    Live. Love. Laugh.
    Balance work, rest, play and pray (enjoy beauty and solitude)
    Sleep soundly. Drink Water. Eat veggies and protein. Walk.
    Wear your seat belt. Don’t smoke. Floss your teeth.
    Put weights overhead. Pick weights off the floor. Carry weights.
    Reread great books. Say thank you

    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    10-29-18 04:31 AM - Post#872780    

    Damn, so that's two articles I have to write, now? This will cut into my PS4 time.
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    RyanG
    Getting the hang of it
    Posts 41
    RyanG
    10-29-18 06:13 AM - Post#872783    

    This has been a very helpful and well-timed discussion.

    I just finished installing my home gym and I was already looking forward to a run of EES but felt unsure how to include squats.

    Serendipity.
    AAnnunz
    Uncle Al
    Posts 23194
    AAnnunz
    10-29-18 08:04 AM - Post#872786    

    Thanks again for being so generous with your knowledge and time, Kyle. As always, your responses are very helpful.
    Be strong. Be in shape. Be a man among men, regardless of your age or circumstances.

    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    10-29-18 09:35 PM - Post#872814    

    Please stop speaking as though I know what I'm talking about, haha. I'm just a guy with a garage gym and a couple of dozen people floating in and out. I share my narrow experience only.
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    thomasjbarrett
    Getting the hang of it
    Posts 41
    thomasjbarrett
    10-30-18 04:48 AM - Post#872834    

    One of the secrets of life is that no one knows what they're talking about. ;)

    Your response was helpful to me and others, it seems, so thank you for sharing your experience.
    This, too, shall pass

    Jordan D
    At home here
    Posts 318
    Jordan D
    10-30-18 08:57 AM - Post#872838    

    Yes, as others have said, thank you Kyle. Your notebooks are an absolute goldmine, sir. This is exactly what I was hoping to find when I posted this thread. Now I just to re-read it all until it passes through my thick skull.
    Old Miler
    Master trainer
    Posts 1382
    Old Miler
    10-30-18 03:38 PM - Post#872851    

    • Kyle Aaron Said:
    Damn, so that's two articles I have to write, now? This will cut into my PS4 time.



    Hey, just write instead of reading for 10 minutes between sets ;-)
    vegpedlr
    Old hand here on IOL
    Posts 1068
    vegpedlr
    11-01-18 01:15 PM - Post#872945    

    I've found four days a week to be the sweet spot for me for Easy Strength. Five days didn't seem to gain me anything more, and I could have used that time for something else. Three days definitely dropped off the improvement, but if my aerobic volume is high, that's necessary. Right now I train four days, when I run it again in the spring, I will do three days.
    Volumiza
    Spencer
    Posts 1558
    Volumiza
    12-25-18 04:25 AM - Post#875648    

    Great thread, thanks Kyle, some great stuff here. Simple insight is always the best.
    'You can throw in the towel or use it to wipe the sweat off your face and keep going'

    'Well ain't this place a geographical oddity? Two weeks from everywhere.' Ulysses Everett McGill

    Czar
    Haven't posted much
    Posts 22
    Czar
    01-05-19 11:15 PM - Post#876075    

    I may have discovered the Soviet secrets here guys...

    This is my first week of the 40 day program. I’m doing the “for dummies” version of “3 sets of 3. Add weight”.

    What I’m doing different this time is greatly overestimating my “2nd or 3rd set” weights. Or so I thought.

    So I’ve done a cycle of greyskull, then madcow, which morphed into my own custom heavy/light/medium setup.

    I ended up with my heavy day being 2x5 at 225 for the squat.
    I had to get pretty amped up for that, and I was wiped out for most of the next week.

    I just completed my fourth workout this week. 3@135,3@185,3@225. This is more reps at that weight than I did in my HLM program, yet I feel I honestly could do it again tonight, much less tomorrow.

    I.e. If I do that weight 5 times per week, that’s 15 reps compared to just 10 on my HLM program.

    Also excellent results on my struggling bench. I did 3 at 155 today and thought it was too easy. Previous best was 2x5 at 155.

    Good stuff Dan. Although I’m afraid that if the first week is going this good, I’ll probably need to stop it next week. :grimace:


    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    02-06-19 05:40 PM - Post#877792    

    Earlier it was asked, why limit the food advice?

    This article answers why: one specific step at a time.

    https://www.otpbooks.com/john-berardi-coaching -compliance
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    Kilban
    Getting the hang of it
    Posts 30
    Kilban
    02-11-19 09:07 AM - Post#878000    

    Will be doing Kyle's style of ES.

    Deadlift, Dumbells CnP, Pull Ups

    4-5 times a week.
    Maybe one day will consist just out of a fun workout with friends (CURLS, Bench, Squats).

    Changing to oats as a breakfast will be the biggest change, I'm more of a bulletproof coffee guy.
    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    02-11-19 06:23 PM - Post#878038    

    Good luck, Kilban.

    I've now added: screens off by 2130.
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    04-04-19 11:02 PM - Post#880596    

    One of the things about walking more is seeing parts of your neighbourhood you wouldn't otherwise. Trees and houses and little shops you never knew about, and of course meeting strangers, who always smile at children, at least the mature adults who aren't magnetically attached to their phones. Nobody smiles and says hello from their car.

    Today we walked from our home to my son's school 3.5km away, and from there along the railway trail to a station 5km further on. Outside the train station they'd put a piano with an invitation for anyone to play. A couple of young women sat to play for a bit before their train, and they played well. Then my daughter had a go.

    Going for long walks gives you moments of unexpected beauty. Long walks are good for your heart in more than just one way.

    For a while I've been telling gym members they need to do 10,000 steps a day. Interestingly, they seem more likely to do it if I put it down in their programmes, compared to if I just say it. I suppose I'll have to give new members a handout. "Eat breakfast. Go for a walk." Etc.

    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    Volumiza
    Spencer
    Posts 1558
    Volumiza
    04-05-19 02:21 AM - Post#880599    

    • Kyle Aaron Said:
    Going for long walks gives you moments of unexpected beauty. Long walks are good for your heart in more than just one way.



    I used to know this! I’ve often thought my life spriralled a little when I stopped training but I also realised that I stopped long distance hiking too. Very little can fill your ‘soul cup’ like a long walk!
    'You can throw in the towel or use it to wipe the sweat off your face and keep going'

    'Well ain't this place a geographical oddity? Two weeks from everywhere.' Ulysses Everett McGill

    Kyle Aaron
    husband, father, PT - in that order
    Posts 1706
    Kyle Aaron
    04-05-19 02:42 AM - Post#880601    

    Then you know what to do.
    Athletic Club East
    Strength in numbers

    AbeSmith64083
    Haven't posted much
    Posts 4
    AbeSmith64083
    03-02-20 11:13 AM - Post#894998    

    I had good success using easy strength to increase my front squat then my back squat. My all time back squat was 440 lbs. Went down to about 385 lbs over course of 5 years. When I started easy strength and pushed it back up to 455. Only did light clean or snatch high pulls in that time frame. Tried to get gains on pressing at the same time but it did not budge those numbers any. I followed a template very closely to what was already listed in this thread.
    Robswanson8318
    Getting the hang of it
    Posts 38
    Robswanson8318
    03-02-20 04:26 PM - Post#895014    

    I have had success increasing my front squats on the program as written. As my strength increased I might do the same working weight and do pause reps before increasing weight. I have run it with back squats and had some success but I would occasionally do an extra set. I feel like it is critical that the hinge doesn’t overlap too much when you use ES to make a run at squats. I also like to put off rest days until about 14 days in, then my body really appreciates the rest. Next cycle I plan on trying pistols with conventional deadlift.
    Matt_T
    Settling in pretty good
    Posts 57
    Matt_T
    07-27-20 04:50 AM - Post#900731    

    People may have different views on how much of a squat it is but I got up to five reps at bw on the RFESS using EES over the spring.



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